reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Carla Morrison, Latin Grammy winning musician of Mexican descent.
Morrison is known for her sweet voice, honest lyrics, and speaking out against body and fat shamming.
Listen to her beautiful single Compartir here.
Picture courtesy of PubliMetro.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Carla Morrison, Latin Grammy winning musician of Mexican descent.

Morrison is known for her sweet voice, honest lyrics, and speaking out against body and fat shamming.

Listen to her beautiful single Compartir here.

Picture courtesy of PubliMetro.

"Si me quieres, quiéreme entera,
no por zonas de luz o sombra…
Si me quieres, quiéreme negra
y blanca. Y gris, y verde, y rubia,
y morena…
Quiéreme día,
quiéreme noche…
¡Y madrugada en la ventana abierta!
Si me quieres, no me recortes:
¡Quiéreme toda… O no me quieras!"

Si me quieres, quiéreme entera por la poetisa cubana Dulce María Loynaz.

If you love me, love me whole
not by zones of light or shadow…
if you love me, love me black
and white, and gray and green and blond,
and mixed…
love me day,
love me night…
and in the morning with the open window!
If you love me, don’t break me in pieces:
love me whole…Or do not love me at all!

If you love me, love me whole by Cuban poet Dulce María Loynaz.

(via reclaimingthelatinatag)

What do you do when you make guacamole and you don’t have chips? You put it on cucumber. Our parents didn’t migrate to this country so we’d be quitters goddammit.

What do you do when you make guacamole and you don’t have chips? You put it on cucumber. Our parents didn’t migrate to this country so we’d be quitters goddammit.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Venezulan race driver Milka Duno, who will debut on Friday night September 22, 2014 as the first Latina to compete in a NASCAR national series race in the United States.
Considered one of the most successful female sportscar racers in history, Duno also holds the record of highest finish for a female driver in the 24 Hours of Daytona. Additionally, Duno is Naval Engineer with four master’s degrees in the fields of Organizational Development, Naval Architecture, Fishing and Aquaculture, and Maritime Business. 
Picture courtesy of Rant Sports.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Venezulan race driver Milka Duno, who will debut on Friday night September 22, 2014 as the first Latina to compete in a NASCAR national series race in the United States.

Considered one of the most successful female sportscar racers in history, Duno also holds the record of highest finish for a female driver in the 24 Hours of Daytona. Additionally, Duno is Naval Engineer with four master’s degrees in the fields of Organizational Development, Naval Architecture, Fishing and Aquaculture, and Maritime Business. 

Picture courtesy of Rant Sports.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Reclaiming The Latina Tag was featured on BuzzFeed!

Here’s the story, which includes some quotes from yours truly provided for the piece and a few of the beautiful selfies some of our followers have submitted:

Tumblr — like Twitter and now Facebook — uses hashtags to categorize conversations on various topics, but what Xochilt Montano found browsing the #latina tag in late 2012 shocked and angered her.

The Reclaiming the Latina Tag founder told BuzzFeed that when she “dared to peek at #latina on Tumblr,” she was shocked to see it was “ALL porn.”

 “That really pushed me over the edge and made me incredibly angry so I had the idea to ‘reclaim’ the tag.” 

Montano sees the selfie as an “act of resistance” against stereotypes.

RTLT regularly makes calls for “Bomb the Latina Tag” sprints, where readers submit photos tagged #latina with information “anywhere from descent, memories, achievements and goals, or random thoughts.” 

Many contributors have been reblogged by fetishists when they tag their selfies.

“It’s pretty tiring having to block all the fetishizing perverts, but it’s worth [it] if we stop seeing hypersexualized (without permission) or demeaning memes on the latina tag. And to creepy people who fetishize yo y mis hermanas: this GIF is for you.”

Readers also submit questions or comments regularly via Tumblr’s Ask feature.

Taking back the tag is about celebration, says Montano: “I want to let people know that there are Latina politicians, writers, activists, scientists, athletes, academics, artists, and award-winning actresses and musicians.”

“I want to celebrate the accomplishments of Latina women and also show that Latinas have different nationalities, races, sexual orientations, ethnicities, psychical characteristics, and social classes…”

“Reclaiming The Latina Tag strives to be a safe space for Latinas to get to know their history and also become inspired by the amazing achievements of other Latinas.”

Montano is the founder but there are four other contributors who also reblog and create content.

To Montano, Latina identity means “finding union within exclusion.”

“Latina for me means being a member of network of women who are proud of their Latin American heritage.”

“Latina means strength to fight against oppression.”

“Latina means our mothers who paved the way for us and our daughters who will continue the resistance.”

“Latina means not apologizing for taking what’s yours.”

“The fight of Reclaiming The Latina Tag cannot be easily accomplished or fulfilled, but I believe that with each new follower we gain and with each post we publish a difference is made.”

(vía reclaimingthelatinatag)

reclaimingthelatinatag:

The tags we have include:

Afrolatina

Literature

LGBT

Art and poetry

Film and television

Indigenous

Music

Immigration

Photography

Politics

Resources

Science

You can also search by country. For example, to search for one word countries (or for terms like Chicana) you’d simply type in such as it appears the following URLS:

reclaimingthelatinatag.tumblr.com/tagged/colombia

or

reclaimingthelatinatag.tumblr.com/tagged/chicana

To search for countries like Puerto Rico you’d type in our URL followed by /tagged/Puerto+Rico

Because Puerto Rico is two words, you have to add a + sign between the words. That’s how it will be for all countries (or terms) that have two words.

comoespinademaguey:

Pueblos indígenas en México
Ubicación en el país.

Indigenous tribes in Mexico.  

comoespinademaguey:

Pueblos indígenas en México

Ubicación en el país.

Indigenous tribes in Mexico.  

reclaimingthelatinatag:

thisisnotlatino:

Proud first generation Chicana, Spanish teacher, Hispanic literature graduate student, main mod over at Reclaiming The Latina Tag, and big fan of This Is Not Latinx.
Keep up the beautiful job y un saludo muy grande.

Your humble main mod here visiting over from This Is Not Latinx, who is celebrating that they hit the 6,000 follower mark by accepting follower selfies. Go forth and submit your beautiful Latin@ faces/follow them if you’re not doing so already! 

I submitted my cara over at This Is Not Latinx, reblogged it to Reclaiming The Latina Tag, and now reblogging that over here. Also that picture is my little avatar image. Matrix?

reclaimingthelatinatag:

thisisnotlatino:

Proud first generation Chicana, Spanish teacher, Hispanic literature graduate student, main mod over at Reclaiming The Latina Tag, and big fan of This Is Not Latinx.

Keep up the beautiful job y un saludo muy grande.

Your humble main mod here visiting over from This Is Not Latinx, who is celebrating that they hit the 6,000 follower mark by accepting follower selfies. Go forth and submit your beautiful Latin@ faces/follow them if you’re not doing so already! 

I submitted my cara over at This Is Not Latinx, reblogged it to Reclaiming The Latina Tag, and now reblogging that over here. Also that picture is my little avatar image. Matrix?

japanteez:

Buddhist Monks all the way from Tibet and India have come to protest in Ferguson.
america-wakiewakie:

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Shot at Least 6 Times | New York Times
Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager who was killed by a police officer, sparking protests around the nation, was shot at least six times, including twice in the head, a preliminary private autopsy performed on Sunday found.
One of the bullets entered the top of Mr. Brown’s skull, suggesting his head was bent forward when it struck him and caused a fatal injury, according to Dr. Michael M. Baden, the former chief medical examiner for the City of New York, who flew to Missouri on Sunday at the family’s request to conduct the separate autopsy. It was likely the last of bullets to hit him, he said.
Mr. Brown, 18, was also shot four times in the right arm, he said, adding that all the bullets were fired into his front.
[…]
“People have been asking: How many times was he shot? This information could have been released on Day 1,” Dr. Baden said in an interview after performing the autopsy. “They don’t do that, even as feelings built up among the citizenry that there was a cover-up. We are hoping to alleviate that.”
Dr. Baden said that while Mr. Brown was shot at least six times, only three bullets were recovered from his body. But he has not yet seen the X-rays showing where the bullets were found, which would clarify the autopsy results. Nor has he had access to witness and police statements.
Dr. Baden provided a diagram of the entry wounds, and noted that the six shots produced numerous wounds. Some of the bullets entered and exited several times, including one that left at least five different wounds.
“This one here looks like his head was bent downward,” he said, indicating the wound at the very top of Mr. Brown’s head. “It can be because he’s giving up, or because he’s charging forward at the officer.”
He stressed that his information does not assign blame or justify the shooting.
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Shot at Least 6 Times | New York Times

Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager who was killed by a police officer, sparking protests around the nation, was shot at least six times, including twice in the head, a preliminary private autopsy performed on Sunday found.

One of the bullets entered the top of Mr. Brown’s skull, suggesting his head was bent forward when it struck him and caused a fatal injury, according to Dr. Michael M. Baden, the former chief medical examiner for the City of New York, who flew to Missouri on Sunday at the family’s request to conduct the separate autopsy. It was likely the last of bullets to hit him, he said.

Mr. Brown, 18, was also shot four times in the right arm, he said, adding that all the bullets were fired into his front.

[…]

“People have been asking: How many times was he shot? This information could have been released on Day 1,” Dr. Baden said in an interview after performing the autopsy. “They don’t do that, even as feelings built up among the citizenry that there was a cover-up. We are hoping to alleviate that.”

Dr. Baden said that while Mr. Brown was shot at least six times, only three bullets were recovered from his body. But he has not yet seen the X-rays showing where the bullets were found, which would clarify the autopsy results. Nor has he had access to witness and police statements.

Dr. Baden provided a diagram of the entry wounds, and noted that the six shots produced numerous wounds. Some of the bullets entered and exited several times, including one that left at least five different wounds.

“This one here looks like his head was bent downward,” he said, indicating the wound at the very top of Mr. Brown’s head. “It can be because he’s giving up, or because he’s charging forward at the officer.”

He stressed that his information does not assign blame or justify the shooting.

(Read Full Text)

"They’re going to keep pushing the envelope,” he said of demonstrators who’ve gotten violent during protests in Ferguson. “There’s no reason to stop. … It’s as simple as training your dog. If you don’t tell them stop biting, guess what, he’s going to continue to bite."

John Newshaw, a retired St. Louis County police officer, for the Huffington Post piece Group Rallies In Support Of Darren Wilson, Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown.

In case people are still claiming that this isn’t race related, former St. Louis County police officer comparing the Ferguson demonstrators to dogs. And let’s face it,  this gross comparison is being made because  the majority of demonstrators are Black. In the same piece  Newshaw even says “This sounds wrong, but I don’t think the black community understands the system.”.

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

(Fuente: skulls-and-tea, vía tempsretrouve)

badassmexicans said: One time I bought parsley instead of cilantro. I felt like had let mi gente down for making such a mistake. Haha

The fact that the gentlemen that runs badassmexicans got this wrong makes me feel so good over that fact that I confused a zucchini for a cucumber.

Earlier today I confused a zucchini for a cucumber

and I didn’t even notice my mistake until I had peeled it. Ridiculous. I am ridiculous.

america-wakiewakie:

Those Kids Crossing the Border From Mexico Wouldn’t Be There If Obama Hadn’t Supported a Coup the Media Doesn’t Talk About | Common Dreams
If you’re reading this, you probably follow the news. So you’ve probably heard of the latest iteration of the “crisis at the border”: tens of thousands of children, many of them unaccompanied by an adult, crossing the desert from Mexico into the United States, where they surrender to the Border Patrol in hope of being allowed to remain here permanently. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s detention and hearing system has been overwhelmed by the surge of children and, in some cases, their parents. The Obama Administration has asked Congress to approve new funding to speed up processing and deportations of these illegal immigrants.
Even if you’ve followed this story closely, you probably haven’t heard the depressing backstory — the reason so many Central Americans are sending their children on adangerous thousand-mile journey up the spine of Mexico, where they ride atop freight trains, endure shakedowns by corrupt police and face rapists, bandits and other predators. (For a sense of what it’s like, check out the excellent 2004 film “Maria Full of Grace.”)
NPR and other mainstream news outlets are parroting the White House, which blamesunscrupulous “coyotes” (human smugglers) for “lying to parents, telling them that if they put their kids in the hands of traffickers and get to the United States that they will be able to stay.” True: the coyotes are saying that in order to gin up business. Also true: U.S. law has changed, and many of these kids have a strong legal case for asylum. Unfortunately, U.S. officials are ignoring the law.
The sad truth is that this “crisis at the border” is yet another example of “blowback.”
Blowback is an unintended negative consequence of U.S. political, military and/or economic intervention overseas — when something we did in the past comes back to bite us in the ass.9/11 is the classic example; arming and funding radical Islamists in the Middle East and South Asia who were less grateful for our help than angry at the U.S.’ simultaneous backing for oppressive governments (The House of Saud, Saddam, Assad, etc.) in the region.
More recent cases include U.S. support for Islamist insurgents in Libya and Syria, which destabilized both countries and led to the murders of U.S. consular officials in Benghazi, and the rise of ISIS, the guerilla army that imperils the U.S.-backed Maliki regime in Baghdad, respectively.
Confusing the issue for casual American news consumers is that the current border crisis doesn’t involve the usual Mexicans traveling north in search of work. Instead, we’re talking about people from Central American nations devastated by a century of American colonialism and imperialism, much of that intervention surprisingly recent. Central American refugees are merely transiting through Mexico.
"The unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States are leaving behind mainly three Central American countries, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The first two are among the world’s most violent and all three have deep poverty, according to a Pew Research report based on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information,” reports NBC News. “El Salvador ranked second in terms of homicides in Latin America in 2011, and it is still high on the list. Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are among the poorest nations in Latin America. Thirty percent of Hondurans, 17 percent of Salvadorans and 26 percent of Guatemalans live on less than $2 a day.”
The fact that Honduras is the biggest source of the exodus jumped out at me. That’s because, in 2009, the United States government — under President Obama — tacitly supported a military coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Honduras. “Washington has a very close relationship with the Honduran military, which goes back decades,” The Guardian noted at the time. “During the 1980s, the US used bases in Honduras to train and arm the Contras, Nicaraguan paramilitaries who became known for their atrocities in their war against the Sandinista government in neighbouring Nicaragua.”
Honduras wasn’t paradise under President Manuel Zelaya. Since the coup, however, the country has entered a downward death spiral of drug-related bloodshed and political revenge killings that crashed the economy, brought an end to law, order and civil society, and now has some analysts calling it a “failed state” along the lines of Somalia and Afghanistan during the 1990s.
"Zelaya’s overthrow created a vacuum in security in which military and police were now focused more on political protest, and also led to a freeze in international aid that markedly worsened socio-economic conditions," Mark Ungar, professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York, told The International Business Times. “The 2009 coup, asserts [Tulane] professor Aaron Schneider, gave the Honduran military more political and economic leverage, at the same time as the state and political elites lost their legitimacy, resources and the capacity to govern large parts of the country.”
El Salvador and Guatemala, also narcostates devastated by decades of U.S. support for oppressive, corrupt right-wing dictatorships, are suffering similar conditions.
(Photo Credit: AP | Supporters of ousted Honduras’ President Manuel Zelaya clash with soldiers near the presidential residency Tegucigalpa, Monday, June 29. 2009. Police fired tear gas to hold back thousands of Hondurans outside the occupied presidential residency as world leaders appealed to Honduras to reverse a coup that ousted the president.)

america-wakiewakie:

Those Kids Crossing the Border From Mexico Wouldn’t Be There If Obama Hadn’t Supported a Coup the Media Doesn’t Talk About | Common Dreams

If you’re reading this, you probably follow the news. So you’ve probably heard of the latest iteration of the “crisis at the border”: tens of thousands of children, many of them unaccompanied by an adult, crossing the desert from Mexico into the United States, where they surrender to the Border Patrol in hope of being allowed to remain here permanently. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s detention and hearing system has been overwhelmed by the surge of children and, in some cases, their parents. The Obama Administration has asked Congress to approve new funding to speed up processing and deportations of these illegal immigrants.

Even if you’ve followed this story closely, you probably haven’t heard the depressing backstory — the reason so many Central Americans are sending their children on adangerous thousand-mile journey up the spine of Mexico, where they ride atop freight trains, endure shakedowns by corrupt police and face rapists, bandits and other predators. (For a sense of what it’s like, check out the excellent 2004 film “Maria Full of Grace.”)

NPR and other mainstream news outlets are parroting the White House, which blamesunscrupulous “coyotes” (human smugglers) for “lying to parents, telling them that if they put their kids in the hands of traffickers and get to the United States that they will be able to stay.” True: the coyotes are saying that in order to gin up business. Also true: U.S. law has changed, and many of these kids have a strong legal case for asylum. Unfortunately, U.S. officials are ignoring the law.

The sad truth is that this “crisis at the border” is yet another example of “blowback.”

Blowback is an unintended negative consequence of U.S. political, military and/or economic intervention overseas — when something we did in the past comes back to bite us in the ass.9/11 is the classic example; arming and funding radical Islamists in the Middle East and South Asia who were less grateful for our help than angry at the U.S.’ simultaneous backing for oppressive governments (The House of Saud, Saddam, Assad, etc.) in the region.

More recent cases include U.S. support for Islamist insurgents in Libya and Syria, which destabilized both countries and led to the murders of U.S. consular officials in Benghazi, and the rise of ISIS, the guerilla army that imperils the U.S.-backed Maliki regime in Baghdad, respectively.

Confusing the issue for casual American news consumers is that the current border crisis doesn’t involve the usual Mexicans traveling north in search of work. Instead, we’re talking about people from Central American nations devastated by a century of American colonialism and imperialism, much of that intervention surprisingly recent. Central American refugees are merely transiting through Mexico.

"The unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States are leaving behind mainly three Central American countries, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The first two are among the world’s most violent and all three have deep poverty, according to a Pew Research report based on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information,” reports NBC News. “El Salvador ranked second in terms of homicides in Latin America in 2011, and it is still high on the list. Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are among the poorest nations in Latin America. Thirty percent of Hondurans, 17 percent of Salvadorans and 26 percent of Guatemalans live on less than $2 a day.”

The fact that Honduras is the biggest source of the exodus jumped out at me. That’s because, in 2009, the United States government — under President Obama — tacitly supported a military coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Honduras. “Washington has a very close relationship with the Honduran military, which goes back decades,” The Guardian noted at the time. “During the 1980s, the US used bases in Honduras to train and arm the Contras, Nicaraguan paramilitaries who became known for their atrocities in their war against the Sandinista government in neighbouring Nicaragua.”

Honduras wasn’t paradise under President Manuel Zelaya. Since the coup, however, the country has entered a downward death spiral of drug-related bloodshed and political revenge killings that crashed the economy, brought an end to law, order and civil society, and now has some analysts calling it a “failed state” along the lines of Somalia and Afghanistan during the 1990s.

"Zelaya’s overthrow created a vacuum in security in which military and police were now focused more on political protest, and also led to a freeze in international aid that markedly worsened socio-economic conditions," Mark Ungar, professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York, told The International Business Times. “The 2009 coup, asserts [Tulane] professor Aaron Schneider, gave the Honduran military more political and economic leverage, at the same time as the state and political elites lost their legitimacy, resources and the capacity to govern large parts of the country.”

El Salvador and Guatemala, also narcostates devastated by decades of U.S. support for oppressive, corrupt right-wing dictatorships, are suffering similar conditions.

(Photo Credit: AP | Supporters of ousted Honduras’ President Manuel Zelaya clash with soldiers near the presidential residency Tegucigalpa, Monday, June 29. 2009. Police fired tear gas to hold back thousands of Hondurans outside the occupied presidential residency as world leaders appealed to Honduras to reverse a coup that ousted the president.)

(vía starklyinaccurate)