Sunset sky from the significant other’s yard. Reason enough to move in.

Sunset sky from the significant other’s yard. Reason enough to move in.

political-linguaphile:

On October 2, 1968, the Plaza of the Three Cultures in the Tlatelolco apartment complex in Mexico City filled up with thousands of students and Tlatelolco residents. The students and residents boldly defied army troops and escalating government brutality. This was happening as hundreds of international journalists gathered in Mexico City for the 1968 Olympic Games, which were just about to get underway.

As darkness fell, soldiers, tanks, and police secretly surrounded the crowd. At a preset signal, helicopters, undercover agents in the crowd, two columns of soldiers advancing in a pincer movement, and tanks opened fire. Over 300 people were murdered and thousands wounded and jailed on that October 2 evening—known as the Massacre of Tlatelolco.

With this savage act, the U.S.-controlled regime of the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party) hoped to isolate and terrorize the student upsurge. Instead, the massacre exposed the real nature of the government—and compelled many people in Mexico to grapple with the question of what it will take to bring about real change.

The massacre of Tlatelolco is still an open wound for the Mexican people. 44 years later, in this year of stolen elections and with the PRI’s return to Presidential power, we’re sadly reminded that things haven’t changed.

Pero aunque nos sigan callando, no se olvida.

(Fuente: mexconnect.com)

may all the girls with short hair remind  you of me

Anónimo ha dicho: Hello! I am currently in a tough situation. I have a project in Spanish class that requires me to dress up as a famous Hispanic person for part of my grade. How do I go about this without appropriating your culture and still able to get a good grade in my class? I was originally planning on dressing as Frida Kahlo, but I knew it would be distasteful to her memory, legacy, and personal beliefs. I am white and I want to know what you think because it's your opinion I care about most.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Firstly, thank you anon for being continuous of your potentially offensive choices.  You’re right that dressing up as Frida Kahlo would be disrespectful.

 I think it’s important to also become aware of the fact that a “Hispanic” person is someone who descents from a Castilian speaking country. The way the message above is worded makes it seems like Hispanic people are one huge homogeneous group, when in reality people of Hispanic descent can come from, either by birth or family decent, countries like Spain and various Latin American nations. The fact that different countries, nationalities, races, and cultures are involved means that there really is no such thing as “Hispanic culture”. Hispanic is more a language related term, which becomes problematic when used to lump people into a single category. I suggest checking out this post I wrote a while back on the subject.

With that said, have you thought about dressing up as a fictional character? I think dressing up as Don Quijote would be hilarious, creative, a A+ worthy.

Hope this helped and good luck,

RTLT (Xochilt)

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Artwork by artist and writer, Cristy C. Road.

Courtesy of Road’s official website, art as it appears above clockwise order:

  1. Raza Encendida. Ink, Marker, Fluid Acrylic, 6x11. 2009
  2. Another weekend . Ink, Marker, Fluid Acrylic, 9x12. 2009
  3. SIN VERGUENZA. Ink, Marker. 2014

Road, a queer Latina of Cuban descent, creates art based on social justice, queer counterculture, and punk rock. Aside from drawing and painting, Road is a performer with the all-queer spoken word road-show, SISTER SPIT: The Next Generation. 

above picture of Road courtesy of Third Woman Press.

To learn more about Road and her work visit her official website.

In honor of a sanity challenging month, I chopped off the shoulder length locks I had managed to grow. I am once again pelona.

In honor of a sanity challenging month, I chopped off the shoulder length locks I had managed to grow. I am once again pelona.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Extended trailer for the documentary Negrita.

From the film’s Official WordPress:

NEGRITA, written and directed by Magdalena Albizu, is a documentary about the  Afro-Latina identity and experience in the United States.

Black Latinos/as are often overlooked or dichotomized as either “black” or “hispanic” in the United States.  However, according to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) , Hispanic or Latino origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States. Hispanic or Latino origin is independent of race and is termed “ethnicity” by the United States Census Bureau.

NEGRITA highlights individual unique Afro-Latina experiences within a broad range of skin color and ethnicity across the United States, while revealing psychological and social factors that add to the confusion, uncertainty, shame and affirmation about one’s self-image of being both “Black”and “Latina”.

NEGRITA aims to establish a ‘black’ consciousness across all generations by reigniting a movement to embrace Latinos’ African roots through a trans-national dialogue on race, identity, ethnicity, nationality and community-building.

Negrita is currently set to be completed September, 2014.

Donate online: http://negritadocumentary.wordpress.com/donate
Website: www.negritadocumentary.com
Follow: @NegritaDoc on Twitter and Facebook

How wrong is it to want to break up with someone because they can’t cook?

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Born in Danlí, Honduras, Lucila Gamero de Medina (June 12, 1873-January 23, 1964) was a novelist recognized among the first women in Honduras to produce literary work. Her most famous books include “Adriana y Margarita”, which is considered the first novel in Honduran narrative literature, and “Blanca Olmedo”, this second novel being Medina’s most known work and standing out as one of Honduras’ most important literary pieces. 
Besides being an prolific writer, Lucila Gamero de Medina studied medicine under her father’s instruction. As a woman in Honduras’ late 19th century, Medina was not allowed to attend medical school and didn’t have an official title, but because of her exceptional knowledge and medical skills did become part of her father’s surgical team and later in life owned and managed a pharmacy. 
Medina was also a feminist who spoke out against the Catholic Church’s unfair expectations held over women, which led to her being shunned from society and upon her death excluded from being given a Christian burial. Although now considered an important figure in Honduran history, Medina’s remains continue to rest in an unmarked headstone.
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Picture courtesy of La Tribunal.
A special shoutout to follower badwolves-dont-blink for suggesting the great Lucila.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Born in Danlí, Honduras, Lucila Gamero de Medina (June 12, 1873-January 23, 1964) was a novelist recognized among the first women in Honduras to produce literary work. Her most famous books include “Adriana y Margarita”, which is considered the first novel in Honduran narrative literature, and “Blanca Olmedo”, this second novel being Medina’s most known work and standing out as one of Honduras’ most important literary pieces. 

Besides being an prolific writer, Lucila Gamero de Medina studied medicine under her father’s instruction. As a woman in Honduras’ late 19th century, Medina was not allowed to attend medical school and didn’t have an official title, but because of her exceptional knowledge and medical skills did become part of her father’s surgical team and later in life owned and managed a pharmacy. 

Medina was also a feminist who spoke out against the Catholic Church’s unfair expectations held over women, which led to her being shunned from society and upon her death excluded from being given a Christian burial. Although now considered an important figure in Honduran history, Medina’s remains continue to rest in an unmarked headstone.

***************************************************************

Picture courtesy of La Tribunal.

A special shoutout to follower  for suggesting the great Lucila.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Remember trans latinas, remember their lives, their hopes, their goals, their dreams #RememberAlejandra

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Carla Morrison, Latin Grammy winning musician of Mexican descent.
Morrison is known for her sweet voice, honest lyrics, and speaking out against body and fat shamming.
Listen to her beautiful single Compartir here.
Picture courtesy of PubliMetro.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Carla Morrison, Latin Grammy winning musician of Mexican descent.

Morrison is known for her sweet voice, honest lyrics, and speaking out against body and fat shamming.

Listen to her beautiful single Compartir here.

Picture courtesy of PubliMetro.

"Si me quieres, quiéreme entera,
no por zonas de luz o sombra…
Si me quieres, quiéreme negra
y blanca. Y gris, y verde, y rubia,
y morena…
Quiéreme día,
quiéreme noche…
¡Y madrugada en la ventana abierta!
Si me quieres, no me recortes:
¡Quiéreme toda… O no me quieras!"

Si me quieres, quiéreme entera por la poetisa cubana Dulce María Loynaz.

If you love me, love me whole
not by zones of light or shadow…
if you love me, love me black
and white, and gray and green and blond,
and mixed…
love me day,
love me night…
and in the morning with the open window!
If you love me, don’t break me in pieces:
love me whole…Or do not love me at all!

If you love me, love me whole by Cuban poet Dulce María Loynaz.

(via reclaimingthelatinatag)

What do you do when you make guacamole and you don’t have chips? You put it on cucumber. Our parents didn’t migrate to this country so we’d be quitters goddammit.

What do you do when you make guacamole and you don’t have chips? You put it on cucumber. Our parents didn’t migrate to this country so we’d be quitters goddammit.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Venezulan race driver Milka Duno, who will debut on Friday night September 22, 2014 as the first Latina to compete in a NASCAR national series race in the United States.
Considered one of the most successful female sportscar racers in history, Duno also holds the record of highest finish for a female driver in the 24 Hours of Daytona. Additionally, Duno is Naval Engineer with four master’s degrees in the fields of Organizational Development, Naval Architecture, Fishing and Aquaculture, and Maritime Business. 
Picture courtesy of Rant Sports.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Venezulan race driver Milka Duno, who will debut on Friday night September 22, 2014 as the first Latina to compete in a NASCAR national series race in the United States.

Considered one of the most successful female sportscar racers in history, Duno also holds the record of highest finish for a female driver in the 24 Hours of Daytona. Additionally, Duno is Naval Engineer with four master’s degrees in the fields of Organizational Development, Naval Architecture, Fishing and Aquaculture, and Maritime Business. 

Picture courtesy of Rant Sports.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Reclaiming The Latina Tag was featured on BuzzFeed!

Here’s the story, which includes some quotes from yours truly provided for the piece and a few of the beautiful selfies some of our followers have submitted:

Tumblr — like Twitter and now Facebook — uses hashtags to categorize conversations on various topics, but what Xochilt Montano found browsing the #latina tag in late 2012 shocked and angered her.

The Reclaiming the Latina Tag founder told BuzzFeed that when she “dared to peek at #latina on Tumblr,” she was shocked to see it was “ALL porn.”

 “That really pushed me over the edge and made me incredibly angry so I had the idea to ‘reclaim’ the tag.” 

Montano sees the selfie as an “act of resistance” against stereotypes.

RTLT regularly makes calls for “Bomb the Latina Tag” sprints, where readers submit photos tagged #latina with information “anywhere from descent, memories, achievements and goals, or random thoughts.” 

Many contributors have been reblogged by fetishists when they tag their selfies.

“It’s pretty tiring having to block all the fetishizing perverts, but it’s worth [it] if we stop seeing hypersexualized (without permission) or demeaning memes on the latina tag. And to creepy people who fetishize yo y mis hermanas: this GIF is for you.”

Readers also submit questions or comments regularly via Tumblr’s Ask feature.

Taking back the tag is about celebration, says Montano: “I want to let people know that there are Latina politicians, writers, activists, scientists, athletes, academics, artists, and award-winning actresses and musicians.”

“I want to celebrate the accomplishments of Latina women and also show that Latinas have different nationalities, races, sexual orientations, ethnicities, psychical characteristics, and social classes…”

“Reclaiming The Latina Tag strives to be a safe space for Latinas to get to know their history and also become inspired by the amazing achievements of other Latinas.”

Montano is the founder but there are four other contributors who also reblog and create content.

To Montano, Latina identity means “finding union within exclusion.”

“Latina for me means being a member of network of women who are proud of their Latin American heritage.”

“Latina means strength to fight against oppression.”

“Latina means our mothers who paved the way for us and our daughters who will continue the resistance.”

“Latina means not apologizing for taking what’s yours.”

“The fight of Reclaiming The Latina Tag cannot be easily accomplished or fulfilled, but I believe that with each new follower we gain and with each post we publish a difference is made.”

(vía reclaimingthelatinatag)